Self-Care

I woke up at 5 in a lot of pain. I realized that to learn to be vulnerable I needed to learn to stop masking my physical pain.

I started writing out my pain stories. I started to get sleepy which usually happens when I’m REALLY trying to avoid something. My rib was really painful though and heat wasn’t helping. I was able to play some YouTube videos that gave me some instant pain relief.

Next step, how do I make sure I actually do exercises regularly?

I need to work dance/song into it. Probably sing the instructions while doing the exercises to turn them into dance moves. Also get out the foam roller.

And I need to set up a music playlist to move me through the day.

I can do the wall arm one while I supervise my geriatric cat eating. And the shoulder squeeze I can do anytime and helps with the pain right away.

W.R.A.P. Wellness Recovery Action Plan

I just found out about this. It’s what I’ve already done as my kiddo’s transition checklist.

I just need to make mine now.

WRAP – Wellness Recovery Action Plan: Ep 1 – Beginning Your WRAP – YouTube

Worksheets:

Preparing to Create Your Personal Recovery Plan

Before you begin to write out a plan of action for your recovery process, you need to first assess your current status and decide upon your major needs and goals. Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  •  What are my motivations for making this change? Keeping my job, my family, my friends? Improving my self-esteem and regaining pride in myself and my behaviors? Feeling better and becoming physically healthier? Other reasons?
  • What challenges will potentially be my biggest barriers? Are my coping skills currently limited? Do I have sufficient support systems (family friends, support groups) in place for times when I may need assistance and encouragement? Do I have legal or financial issues to address as part of my plan of action?
  • Can I commit to following the steps I create in order to change my life? Can I honestly say that I am ready to make a major, positive change in my life and that I am willing to do what it takes to make it happen?

If you can identify your motivations, understand your challenges and recognize that the outcome will be worth the effort, you will be ready to create your plan.

Components of Your Personal Recovery Plan

When you are ready to write your plan, make lists of the elements that you will want to address:

  • Personal triggers (places, circumstances, people) to avoid
  • Specific strategies for addressing each identified trigger situation
  • Ways to improve self-care (relaxation strategies, socialization opportunities, health and wellness strategies – sufficient sleep, good diet etc.)
  • Coping skills you need to learn or to improve (anger management, emotional self-regulation etc.)
  • Relapse prevention strategies (go to support group meetings, have a “sober buddy,” attend counseling, etc.)

Writing Your Personal Recovery Plan

You can create your written plan any way that feels most natural to you. In general, you’ll be making “promises” about the positive changes that you plan to implement, in order to uphold your recovery and remain abstinent. In addition, you may also want to commit to certain consequences that you will be willing to incur, should you not live up to your promises. You will also want to detail specific steps that you will take to address each problem or issue that is a threat to your sobriety.

Developing Your Personal Recovery Plan (Template Included)

Autistic employee goes viral with office sign that breaks down ‘bad communicator’ stereotypes – Upworthy

I’m autistic.

I prefer direct, literal and detailed communication

If I am:

Not making eye contact

Not greeting you back

Not understanding your social cues, etc.

There is no malicious intent. It is the autism.

Thank you for understanding.

https://www.upworthy.com/autistic-employee-called-a-bad-communicator-responds-by-hanging-an-important-sign-in-the-office

“This should be the norm tbh!! very proud of you for stating your boundaries and needs clearly,” Alastar wrote. “I wish everyone had signs telling me how to communicate tbh,” Bro added.

“How is it that we prefer direct, literal, and detailed communication, but somehow WE’RE the ones with a communication issue???” Reading cosmere! wrote.

https://www.upworthy.com/autistic-employee-called-a-bad-communicator-responds-by-hanging-an-important-sign-in-the-office

“The funniest thing about the comment section of my autism sign video is the people who are asking me, ‘Are you self-diagnosed? Are you formally diagnosed?’” he said in the video. “Do you think neurotypical people would make a sign like that? Do you think that would happen? Do you think a neurotypical person would do that?”

https://www.upworthy.com/autistic-employee-called-a-bad-communicator-responds-by-hanging-an-important-sign-in-the-office

Do My Dailies

Daily schedule, routine, rhythm, agenda, care tasks – call it what you will.

Slow Down to Speed Up

Do each thing completely and well.

To focus, find the gratitude, and remember the reason – connection and care.

Connect with yourself to know how to care for yourself. Connect with your environment to care for it – it’s your habitat and caring for it is caring for yourself. Your body, the place you are right now, your home, your neighborhood, city, county, state, country, continent, your planet.

Start from the center and work outward. From the seed grows the tree, and its full reach is unseen.

Documentation is key. If you don’t have time to write it down….you’re doing too much. So I’m documenting.

  • Wake up
  • Take medication (should be in waist pouch from night before)
  • Dental care either time based (every 12 hours) or cue based (after morning bathroom break)
  • Any other required self care
  • Care for infants or pets next as they cannot do so for themselves (for me that’s cats)
    • medication
    • water
    • food
    • litter
    • grooming
  • Document anything that no checklist exists for yet.

POTS and not the cooking or herbal kind

Here’s some info on POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome) – which I think might also be called Vasovagal Syndrome – at least it sure sounds the same to me, possibly the vasovagal one is missing the other related symptoms. Either because they aren’t there or just the connection isn’t being made since they aren’t what a cardiologist might be looking at. 

Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) (for Parents) – Nemours KidsHealth

I didn’t discover it until 2005-2010ish, but looking back it explains my temperature intolerances, fainting, dizziness, vertigo, fatigue, tunnel vision, chemical sensitivities, etc. and those either developed or got worse during my teenage years.

Being pregnant and having the associated increased blood volume was the best I ever felt and I finally figured out the wall of fatigue the first couple days of/before my period is from the drop in blood volume.

It also addresses the gas and nausea I would have that was one of my worst symptoms. I didn’t figure that out until much later and even then I didn’t know why, it took my ADHD doctor to explain it to me because he was monitoring my blood pressure while we found the right dosage of Adderall. Turns out that the side effect of increased blood pressure is super helpful for me and I was able to reduce my Midodrine by half or more.

I only figured out my POTS because I kept seeing the acronym when I was looking up EDS info. When I went to look that up it was another epiphany moment for me.

Syncope can trigger your sympathetic nervous system (panic! the brain isn’t getting blood to provide oxygen!!), and then when you recover that can kick off the parasympathetic system (rest & digest – time to dump some digestive juices into your empty stomach!) which can then result in gas, bloating & nausea.

Video shares

A list of stuff I think is worth watching/listening to:

Rehearse for life

I can’t find the article, but when the kiddo was biting more, I remember reading that you can’t tell a child not to bite when they are flooded (Gottman term for the amygdala being in charge), and just telling them not to bite when they are calm doesn’t work – they can’t remember in the heat of the moment. You have to role play appropriate responses.

Like training for martial arts so that when you are in fight/flight/freeze your automatic reflexes take over.

We have a policy that once calm and we’ve figured out what the problem was, we have to roleplay a healthier/more adaptive method at least 3 times so that those neural pathways are reinforced more than the maladaptive ones that were defaulted to. And for really big things like hitting or biting we do at least 5 – and include variations. Basically the “What Would Danny Do?” (there is a Darla one out now too) books, but instead acting them out and using our situations. We also tell (and keep meaning to write up) “choose your own adventure” versions – the first is what actually happened and why, and then we come up with two or three more other options and results.

This can also help with theory of mind and empathy. It is the reason that pretend play is so important and if it doesn’t come naturally, it should get modeled. The Hot Wheels City videos on YouTube actually helped us with that. The kiddo didn’t like watching real life people but that one only shows the hands using toys to do pretend play.